Why you have free will

Now my two-part essay about free will is published at Mentsch Magazine. Why is it reasonable to think that we can be the cause of our actions? Have we learnt anything about the functioning of nature that gives us reason to doubt this? What do we mean by freedom of the will, and why is it in reality impossible to give arguments against it? I suspect you will find them very interesting.

Part 1:
Why Our Will Causes Things (1/2)

Part 2:
Why the Idea of Free Will Is Not That Crazy (2/2)

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From the text:

The effectiveness of real mental causality is necessary for you to read and think about this essay. Sensing and perceiving, require a physical-to-mental-causation. Thinking requires mental-to-mental causation, as you process strings of sentences in logical succession in your mind, or deduct new knowledge from existing knowledge. Communication require mental-to-physical-to-mental causation, as my knowledge needs to be mediated through my voice or my keyboard, to be perceived by some curious spirit at the internet, and absorbed into their mind.

Illustration photo from Pixabay.